Online labs provide your students with the possibility to conduct scientific experiments in an online environment. Remotely-operated labs (remote labs) offer an opportunity to experiment with real equipment from remote locations. Virtual labs simulate the scientific equipment. Data sets present data from already performed lab experiments. Please use the filters on the right to find appropriate online labs for your class. Labs can be combined with dedicated Apps to create Inquiry Learning Spaces (ILSs).

If you are looking for online labs especially suitable for the curricula of Benin, Kenya or Nigeria, please visit our Collections page.

If you select labs in English, the descriptions on this website will still be displayed in English. However, when you include the lab in an ILS and change the language setting of the ILS to English, the lab will be displayed in English within the ILS.

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Build an atom out of protons, neutrons, and electrons, and see how the element, charge, and mass change. Then play a game to test your ideas!

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How do you know if a chemical equation is balanced? What can you change to balance an equation? Play a game to test your ideas! Primary aims of the lab:

Rating: 2 - 1 votes

Explore the forces at work when pulling against a cart,and pushing a refrigerator, crate, or person. Create an applied force and see how it makes objects move. Change friction and see how it affects the motion of objects.Aims of the lab:

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There is an updated version of this lab. This simulation demonstrates the influence of temperature, light intensity, and CO2 on photosynthesis.

Rating: 5 - 1 votes

Why do objects like wood float in water? Does it depend on size? Create a custom object to explore the effects of mass and volume on density. Can you discover the relationship? Use the scale to measure the mass of an object, then hold the object under water to measure its volume.

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Explore what happens at the molecular level during a phase change. The three common physical states of matter (also called phases) are solid, liquid and gas. Matter can change phase with the addition or subtraction of heat. Molecules are always in motion.

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A computer interactive developed for the Microcosm exhibition at CERN introducing the workings of a particle accelerator like the Large Hadron Collider. Users of the interactive discover how, for example, protons are accelerated using electromagnetic fields.

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Create your own sandwich and then see how many sandwiches you can make with different amounts of ingredients. Do the same with chemical reactions. See how many products you can make with different amounts of reactants. The primary aims of the lab are:

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Explore the role of pore size in the diffusion of a substance across a membrane. Diffusion is the process of a substance spreading out from its origin. Molecules diffuse through random molecular motion.

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Learn how friction causes a material to heat up and melt. Rub two objects together and they heat up. When one reaches the melting temperature, particles break free as the material melts away. Primary aims of the labDescribe a model for friction a molecular level.

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Make sparks fly with John Travoltage. Wiggle Johnnie's foot and he picks up charges from the carpet. Bring his hand close to the door knob and get rid of the excess charge.Sample Learning Goals

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Understanding the structure of the atmosphere is critical in understanding where and how global warming occurs. This visualization illustrates the major layers in the atmosphere and identifies a number of key characteristics and defining attributes of each layer. 

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CERNland contains games on all topics related to the CERN activity. It is the virtual theme park developed to bring the excitement of CERN's research to a young audience aged between 7 and 12.

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Learn about the physics of resistance in a wire. Change its resistivity, length, and area to see how they affect the wire's resistance. The sizes of the symbols in the equation change along with the diagram of a wire. Primary aims:

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Phase Changes are changes of state, such as the change from liquid to gas, solid to liquid, or gas to liquid. When we heat particles, why are they able to change their state?

Rating: 3 - 2 votes

Diffusion describes how particles of matter move through other liquids and gases (including air). Diffusion explains how the mass of particles and temperature are related to how quickly particles spread out over an area.

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Do you ever wonder how a greenhouse gas affects the climate, or why the ozone layer is important? Use the sim to explore how light interacts with molecules in our atmosphere.

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Light a light bulb by waving a magnet. This demonstration of Faraday's Law shows you how to reduce your power bill at the expense of your grocery bill.

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Explore molecule shapes by building molecules in 3D! Find out how a molecule's shape changes as you add atoms to a molecule.The primary aims of the lab are:1) Recognize that molecule shape is due to repulsions between atoms

Rating: 2 - 1 votes

How does solar radiation interact with the Earth and its atmosphere to cause global warming? Use this lab to see what’s going on at the molecular level.

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Phase Changes are changes of state, such as the change from liquid to gas, solid to liquid, or gas to liquid. When we heat particles, why are they able to change their state?

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While all molecules are attracted to each other, some attractions are stronger than others. Non-polar molecules are attracted through a London dispersion attraction; polar molecules are attracted through both the London dispersion force and the stronger dipole-dipole attraction.

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Explore bending of light between two media with different indices of refraction. See how changing from air to water to glass changes the bending angle. Play with prisms of different shapes and make rainbows.

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In this lab, our objective is to study the shift of equilibrium between ferric ions and thiocyanate ions by increasing the concentration of either of them. 

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Explore the interactions that cause water and oil to separate from a mixture. Oil is a non-polar molecule, while water is a polar molecule. While all molecules are attracted to each other, some attractions are stronger than others.

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Explore molecule shapes by building molecules in 3D! How does molecule shape change with different numbers of bonds and electron pairs? Find out by adding single, double or triple bonds and lone pairs to the central atom. Then, compare the model to real molecules!

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Kinetic Molecular Theory describes the behavior of tiny gas particles, which are too small to be seen even with the strongest microscope. Kinetic means "motion," so the theory is all about particles moving!

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An interactive whiteboard activity where students build an atom by dragging electrons, neutrons and protons onto the template. The element information box shows if they are correct. The animation can also be used to show how ions form.

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Explore the role of temperature in the rate of diffusion of a substance. Diffusion is the process of a substance spreading out from its origin. Molecules diffuse through random molecular motion.

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This lab is an abridged Html5 version of the Flash-based Photolab. It has been optimized to work with tablet computers.

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This lab is designed to have students examine the different factors that affect the rate of heat transfer through a barrier between two gases. 

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While all molecules are attracted to each other, some attractions are stronger than others. Non-polar molecules are attracted through a London dispersion attraction; polar molecules are attracted through both the London dispersion force and the stronger dipole-dipole attraction.

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Explore the role of permeable membrane in diffusion. Diffusion is the process of a substance spreading out from its origin. Molecules diffuse through random molecular motion.

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 Heat, cool and compress atoms and molecules and watch as they change between solid, liquid and gas phases.Sample learning goals:

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Explore the structure of a gas at the molecular level. Molecules are always in motion. Molecules in a gas move quickly. All molecules are attracted to each other. Molecules can be weakly or strongly attracted to each other.

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The three common physical states of matter are solid, liquid and gas. All matter is made up of atoms, which make up molecules. Atoms and molecules can be weakly or strongly attracted to each other.

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Explore different types of attractions between molecules. While all molecules are attracted to each other, some attractions are stronger than others.

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Investigate the difference in attractive force between polar and non-polar molecules by “pulling” apart pairs of molecules. While all molecules are attracted to each other, some attractions are stronger than others.

Rating: 1 - 1 votes

Convert between pH values and concentration of hydronium ions. An interactive graph visualizes the formulaic relationship.   

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This lab is will allow students to vary the resistance of a light bulb and the voltage difference across a light bulb. They will be able to see how these two factors affect the current through the light bulb and the power used by the light bulb. 

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Explore the structure of a liquid at the molecular level. Molecules are always in motion. Molecules in a liquid move moderately. All molecules are attracted to each other. Molecules can be weakly or strongly attracted to each other.

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This lab was designed to have students notice the difference between static friction and sliding friction. They will change the mass of an object that is being pulled across a surface and plot out the changes to friction vs. normal.

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This lab is designed to have students investigate the changes that occur to images formed by converging lenses based on the focal length of the lens, the height of the object and the location of the object.  

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Explore the structure of a solid at the molecular level. Molecules are always in motion, though molecules in a solid move slowly. All molecules are attracted to each other. Molecules can be weakly or strongly attracted to each other.

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Reduction of anthropogenic carbon emission into the atmosphere is one of the present day's greatest challenges.

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Each material has a particular molecular structure, which is responsible for the material's mechanical properties. The molecular structure of each material affects how it responds to an applied force at the macroscopic level.The primary aim of the lab is:

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Explore what happens when a force is exerted on a ceramic material. There are many different types of materials. Each material has a particular molecular structure, which is responsible for the material's mechanical properties.

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This lab is designed to have students investigate the relationship between the speed of a wave, the frequency of the wave and the wavelength of the wave. Students can vary wave speed and frequency. Each of these should be varied while leaving the other variable constant.

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This applet is used to explore the relationship between the isotopic ratios of an element and the element's atomic weight. Select any atomic element and manipulate its isotope ratios using the provided pie chart or table.

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This lab is designed to have students investigate the relationships between voltage, resistance and current in a circuit with only one passive component. The batteries in this simulation can be varied from ideal batteries to batteries containing internal resistance. 

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The behaviour of CFCs is dependent on both the wavelength of radiation as well as position of the molecule in the atmosphere. In this visualization the user can investigate the various interaction modes of a CFC molecule with electromagnetic radiation across the entire spectrum.

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This lab is designed to have students investigate the changes to wavelength and frequency that occur when the source of the waves is in motion. 

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This lab is designed to allow students to look at the factors affecting the angle at which constructive interference occurs for waves passing through a two slit diffraction grating. 

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Students working at a distance in two different ILSs share a simulation similar to the Rate of Photosynthesis Lab, but are able to control only one of two variables (lamp intensity or the season of the year).

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This lab is designed to have students investigate the relationship between the radius of curvature and the location of the focal point for a mirror like situation. 

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  This simulation visualizes the repationships between temperature, volume and presure with a help of movable wall. Students can change number of molecules and temperature to see how volume and pressure are affected.    

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This lab is designed to have students look at the conversion of electrical energy into heat energy. Students will have control over the amount of water in their beaker, the voltage of the power supply and the time they add energy to the water. 

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This environment has been created to allow students to look at how the size of pipes affects the speed and pressure of the fluid moving through the pipe. 

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This lab is designed to help students visualize the formation of beats and the relationship between the number of beats per second and the beat frequency heard by the observer. 

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A model of the sodium thiosulphate and hydrochloric acid investigation. It might help some students understand what is going on.

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Explore what happens when a force is exerted on a tire material. There are many different types of materials. Each material has a particular molecular structure, which is responsible for the material's mechanical properties.

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  This simulation demonstrates the relationship between the number of molucules of a gas and the volume they occupy.

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This simulation visualizes a molecular structure of plastic. Each material has a particular molecular structure, which is responsible for the material's mechanical properties.

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This simulation visualizes different eye effects, such as astigmatism, hyperopia and myopia, and how they can be fixed with different types of glass lenses. 

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This lab lets a student determine and compare the amount of degradation of two types of plastic: degradable