Online labs provide your students with the possibility to conduct scientific experiments in an online environment. Remotely-operated labs (remote labs) offer an opportunity to experiment with real equipment from remote locations. Virtual labs simulate the scientific equipment. Data sets present data from already performed lab experiments. Please use the filters on the right to find appropriate online labs for your class. Labs can be combined with dedicated Apps to create Inquiry Learning Spaces (ILSs).

If you are looking for online labs especially suitable for the curricula of Benin, Kenya or Nigeria, please visit our Collections page.

If you select labs in Central Khmer, the descriptions on this website will still be displayed in English. However, when you include the lab in an ILS and change the language setting of the ILS to Central Khmer, the lab will be displayed in Central Khmer within the ILS.

Rating: 3 - 1 votes

This lab allows the user to visualise the gravitational force that two objects exert on each other. It is possible to change properties of the objects in order to see how that changes the gravitational force between them.

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How do you know if a chemical equation is balanced? What can you change to balance an equation? Play a game to test your ideas! Primary aims of the lab:

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Learn about conservation of energy with a skater dude! Explore different tracks and view the kinetic energy, potential energy and friction as he moves. Build your own tracks, ramps and jumps for the skater. Aims of the lab:

Rating: 5 - 1 votes

Why do objects like wood float in water? Does it depend on size? Create a custom object to explore the effects of mass and volume on density. Can you discover the relationship? Use the scale to measure the mass of an object, then hold the object under water to measure its volume.

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Watch a string vibrate in slow motion. Wiggle the end of the string and make waves, or adjust the frequency and amplitude of an oscillator. Adjust the damping and tension. The end can be fixed, loose, or open.Primary aims of the lab:

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Why does a balloon stick to your sweater? Rub a balloon on a sweater, then let go of the balloon and it flies over and sticks to the sweater. View the charges in the sweater, balloons, and the wall.

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Create your own sandwich and then see how many sandwiches you can make with different amounts of ingredients. Do the same with chemical reactions. See how many products you can make with different amounts of reactants. The primary aims of the lab are:

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Make a whole rainbow by mixing red, green, and blue light. Change the wavelength of a monochromatic beam or filter white light. View the light as a solid beam, or see the individual photons.Aims of the lab:

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Make sparks fly with John Travoltage. Wiggle Johnnie's foot and he picks up charges from the carpet. Bring his hand close to the door knob and get rid of the excess charge.Sample Learning Goals

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Play with objects on a teeter totter to learn about balance. Test what you've learned by trying the Balance Challenge game. The primary aims of the lab are: 1) Predict how objects of various masses can be used to make a plank balance,

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Do you ever wonder how a greenhouse gas affects the climate, or why the ozone layer is important? Use the sim to explore how light interacts with molecules in our atmosphere.

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When is a molecule polar? Change the electronegativity of atoms in a molecule to see how it affects polarity. See how the molecule behaves in an electric field. Change the bond angle to see how shape affects polarity.Sample Learning Goals

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How did Rutherford figure out the structure of the atom without being able to see it? Simulate the famous experiment in which he disproved the Plum Pudding model of the atom by observing alpha particles bouncing off atoms and determining that they must have a small core.