Online labs provide your students with the possibility to conduct scientific experiments in an online environment. Remotely-operated labs (remote labs) offer an opportunity to experiment with real equipment from remote locations. Virtual labs simulate the scientific equipment. Data sets present data from already performed lab experiments. Please use the filters on the right to find appropriate online labs for your class. Labs can be combined with dedicated Apps to create Inquiry Learning Spaces (ILSs).

If you are looking for online labs especially suitable for the curricula of Benin, Kenya or Nigeria, please visit our Collections page.

If you select labs in Norwegian Bokmål, the descriptions on this website will still be displayed in English. However, when you include the lab in an ILS and change the language setting of the ILS to Norwegian Bokmål, the lab will be displayed in Norwegian Bokmål within the ILS.

Rating: 3 - 1 votes

This lab allows the user to visualise the gravitational force that two objects exert on each other. It is possible to change properties of the objects in order to see how that changes the gravitational force between them.

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Build an atom out of protons, neutrons, and electrons, and see how the element, charge, and mass change. Then play a game to test your ideas!

Rating: 2 - 1 votes

Explore the forces at work when pulling against a cart,and pushing a refrigerator, crate, or person. Create an applied force and see how it makes objects move. Change friction and see how it affects the motion of objects.Aims of the lab:

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Test the pH of things like coffee, spit, and soap to determine whether each is acidic, basic, or neutral. Visualize the relative number of hydroxide ions and hydronium ions in solution. Switch between logarithmic and linear scales.

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Learn about conservation of energy with a skater dude! Explore different tracks and view the kinetic energy, potential energy and friction as he moves. Build your own tracks, ramps and jumps for the skater. Aims of the lab:

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Explore what happens at the molecular level during a phase change. The three common physical states of matter (also called phases) are solid, liquid and gas. Matter can change phase with the addition or subtraction of heat. Molecules are always in motion.

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See how the equation form of Ohm's law relates to a simple circuit. Adjust the voltage and resistance, and see the current change according to Ohm's law. The sizes of the symbols in the equation change to match the circuit diagram. Sample Learning Goals

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Explore how hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions cause proteins to fold into specific shapes. Proteins, made up of amino acids, are used for many different purposes in the cell. The cell is an aqueous (water-filled) environment.

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Explore how changing the DNA sequence can change the amino acid sequence of a protein. Proteins are composed of long strings of amino acids. Proteins are coded for in the DNA. DNA is composed of four different types of nucleotides.

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Explore how the code embedded in DNA is translated into a protein. The process of converting the information in DNA into protein is a two-step process, involving transcription and translation. In transcription, an mRNA copy is made of the DNA.

Rating: 5 - 1 votes

Test the pH of things like coffee, spit, and soap to determine whether each is acidic, basic, or neutral. Visualize the relative number of hydroxide ions and hydronium ions in solution. Switch between logarithmic and linear scales.

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Stretch and compress springs to explore the relationships between force, spring constant, displacement, and potential energy! Investigate what happens when two springs are connected in series and parallel.

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Do you ever wonder how a greenhouse gas affects the climate, or why the ozone layer is important? Use the sim to explore how light interacts with molecules in our atmosphere.

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Light a light bulb by waving a magnet. This demonstration of Faraday's Law shows you how to reduce your power bill at the expense of your grocery bill.

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Investigate the relationship between the volume of a gas and the pressure it exerts on its container. This relationship is commonly known as Boyle's Law. The pressure of a gas tends to decrease as the volume of the gas increases. Primary aims of the Lab:

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While all molecules are attracted to each other, some attractions are stronger than others. Non-polar molecules are attracted through a London dispersion attraction; polar molecules are attracted through both the London dispersion force and the stronger dipole-dipole attraction.

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Explore pressure at the atomic level. All matter is made up of atoms, which make up molecules. These atoms and molecules are always in motion. When atoms and molecules are contained, we can measure the amount of pressure they exert on the container.

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Explore the interactions that cause water and oil to separate from a mixture. Oil is a non-polar molecule, while water is a polar molecule. While all molecules are attracted to each other, some attractions are stronger than others.

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Explore how an mRNA copy is made of DNA. Protein complexes separate the DNA helix to allow complementary mRNA nucleotides to bind to the DNA sequence. The pairing of nucleotides is very specific.The primary aim of the lab is:1) To learn about DNA and nucleotides 

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Explore the relationship between the temperature of a gas and its volume. This is commonly known as Charles's Law. The volume of a gas tends to increase as the temperature increases. Primary aims of the Lab: 1) To learn about Charles's Law

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Explore molecule shapes by building molecules in 3D! How does molecule shape change with different numbers of bonds and electron pairs? Find out by adding single, double or triple bonds and lone pairs to the central atom. Then, compare the model to real molecules!

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Explore how a protein is made from an mRNA sequence. In translation, the mRNA leaves the nucleus and attaches to a ribosome. Transfer RNA (tRNA) molecules bring amino acids to the ribosome.

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Explore the role of temperature in the rate of diffusion of a substance. Diffusion is the process of a substance spreading out from its origin. Molecules diffuse through random molecular motion.

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Explore the relationship between the temperature of a gas and the pressure it exerts on its container. This is commonly known as Gay-Lussac's Law or Amontons' Law of Pressure-Temperature. As the temperature of a gas increases, the pressure it exerts on its container will increase.

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While all molecules are attracted to each other, some attractions are stronger than others. Non-polar molecules are attracted through a London dispersion attraction; polar molecules are attracted through both the London dispersion force and the stronger dipole-dipole attraction.

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Explore the structure of a gas at the molecular level. Molecules are always in motion. Molecules in a gas move quickly. All molecules are attracted to each other. Molecules can be weakly or strongly attracted to each other.

Rating: 3 - 1 votes

Explore the role of temperature in the rate of diffusion of a substance. Diffusion is the process of a substance spreading out from its origin. Molecules diffuse through random molecular motion.

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Explore different types of attractions between molecules. While all molecules are attracted to each other, some attractions are stronger than others.

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Explore the structure of a liquid at the molecular level. Molecules are always in motion. Molecules in a liquid move moderately. All molecules are attracted to each other. Molecules can be weakly or strongly attracted to each other.

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Explore the structure of a solid at the molecular level. Molecules are always in motion, though molecules in a solid move slowly. All molecules are attracted to each other. Molecules can be weakly or strongly attracted to each other.

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Explore the role of a molecule's mass with respect to its diffusion rate. Diffusion is the process of a substance spreading out from its origin. Molecules diffuse through random molecular motion.

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How did Rutherford figure out the structure of the atom without being able to see it? Simulate the famous experiment in which he disproved the Plum Pudding model of the atom by observing alpha particles bouncing off atoms and determining that they must have a small core.

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Explore the role of charge in interatomic interactions. The forces attracting neutral atoms are called Van der Waals attractions, which can be weak or strong, depending on the atoms involved.

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Explore the role of polarity in the strength of intermolecular attractions. While all molecules are attracted to each other, some attractions are stronger than others.

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Express yourself through your genes!

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Are all atoms of an element the same? How can you tell one isotope from another? Use the sim to learn about isotopes and how abundance relates to the average atomic mass of an element.

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Explore the role of size and shape in the strength of London dispersion attractions. While all molecules are attracted to each other, some attractions are stronger than others.

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 This lab helps to better understand the following phenomena:Interaction PotentialAtomic BondingVan der Waals Force

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There are two kinds of attractive forces shown in this model: Coulomb forces (the attraction between ions) and Van der Waals forces (an additional attractive force between all atoms).

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This lab lets you visualize the electrostatic force that two charges exert on each other. Students can observe how changing the sign and magnitude of the charges and the distance between them affects the electrostatic force. Sample learning goals: