Inquiry Learning Spaces (ILSs) are personalized learning resources for students, including a lab, apps, and any other type of multimedia material. ILSs follow an inquiry cycle. Inquiry cycles can differ but the basic Go-Lab cycle consists of the phases Orientation, Conceptualisation, Investigation, Conclusion, and Discussion. The aim of an ILS is to provide students with an opportunity to conduct scientific experiments, being guided through the inquiry process and supported at each step.

This page presents ILSs created by teachers or the Go-Lab and/or Next-Lab team (and often in co-creation), on a large set of domains and in many languages. You can create ILSs starting from an online lab, but also copy and adapt an existing ILS with the help of the Go-Lab authoring platform. Visit the Support page where you will find demo-videos, tips & tricks, and user manuals, that explain how to work with the Go-Lab authoring platform and how to publish your own ILS once it is finished.

If you select ILSs in English, the descriptions on this website will still be displayed in English, except if the ILS author has provided the description in English. However, if you click on the preview button or copy an ILS to Graasp, the ILS will be displayed in English, as created by the ILS author.

Being an astronaut is one of the coolest jobs out there! However, what does it take for someone to become an astronaut? Let's find out!
<p>The Water cycle in nature is the continuous process of water flowing within the Earth's hydrosphere.This ILS aims to develop the exploration / investigation capabilities of reality by observing and experimenting with physical phenomena.</p>
Ohm's Law deals with the relationship between voltage and current in an ideal conductor. This relationship states that:
We aim to find out where the error lies in placing geometry elements.
In this Inquiry Learning Space, the students will have the chance to explore the Sun's activity through the measuring of the size and counting of the number of Its Sun spots.
We aim to find out where the error lies in placing geometry elements.Two figures are composed of the same polygons but in another order.
What is a Star? How is a Star born? Have you ever wondered what happens to the different stars in the night sky as they get older?